Wednesday, 19 July 2017

Couple found perfectly preserved in Swiss glacier after disappearing 75 years ago

Pictured: Couple found in Swiss glacier after disappearing 75 years ago
                                                                   (Picture: Handout)







The couple whose bodies were found perfectly preserved in a Swiss glacier after they disappeared more than 75 years ago have been pictured. 
Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin went missing after going to milk their cows in a meadow above Chandolin in the Valais canton on August 15, 1942.


The couple never returned from their trip, and officials at the Glacier 3000 ski resort said that the couple had likely fallen into a crevasse.
But on Thursday, their bodies were found lying next to each other by the Tsanfleuron glacier at an altitude of 2,615m, along with backpacks, a bottle, a book and a watch.
The head of the resort, Bernard Tschannen, told Le Matin daily: ‘It was a man and a woman wearing clothes from the last (world) war. The ice preserved them perfectly and their belongings were intact’.
Local reports say they were identified by their wartime identity papers.
Pictured: Couple found in Swiss glacier after disappearing 75 years ago
Their bodies were found lying next to each other by the Tsanfleuron glacier at an altitude of 2,615m, along with backpacks, a bottle, a book and a watch.(Picture: Getty Images)
A DNA search has been planned to confirm their identities, but Marceline Udry-Dumoulin said she believed the remains were of her parents.
Dumoulin, 79, who was four when her parents went missing, told the paper: ‘We spent our whole lives searching for them, without stopping. We never thought we’d be able to give them the funeral they deserved.

‘I can say that after 75 years of waiting this news gives me a deep sense of calm,
Searches were carried out for more than two months but in the end, Dumoulin and her five brothers and one sister were placed in foster homes.
The 79-year-old said: ‘It was the first time my mother went with him on such an excursion. She was always pregnant and couldn’t climb in the difficult conditions of a glacier.
‘After a while, we children were separated and placed in families. I was lucky to stay with my aunt,’ she said.
‘We all lived in the region but became strangers.’
‘For the funeral, I won’t wear black. I think that white would be more appropriate. It represents hope, which I never lost.’
The couple will be buried later this month in a joint service at their local church.

Metro.co.uk









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